AbWMA MARKS WORLD MALARIA DAY 

World Malaria Day Observed

The Ablekuma West Municipal Assembly recently celebrated World Malaria Day on the 25th of April at Glefe. The day was marked with a series of events and activities that aimed to raise awareness about the dangers of malaria and the importance of prevention.

Malaria is a life-threatening disease that is transmitted through the bite of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes. It is a leading cause of death and illness in many African countries, and Ghana is no exception.

World Malaria Day Observed

The celebration of World Malaria Day in Ablekuma West was a way of highlighting the ongoing efforts to combat malaria in the municipality. The event brought together representatives from the health sector, community leaders, and members of the public.

The day started with a health walk through the streets of Glefe, which aimed to raise awareness about the importance of keeping the environment clean and free of stagnant water, which is a breeding ground for mosquitoes. This was followed by a community durbar, where members of the community were educated on the various methods of malaria prevention and treatment.

One of the main themes of the event was the use of long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets (LLINs). These nets are a proven and highly effective method of preventing malaria, as they provide a physical barrier that protects users from mosquito bites.

World Malaria Day Observed

The facilitator emphasised the importance of LLINs in her address to the community. She urged the public to make use of the LLINs that had been distributed to them, as well as to ensure that they were properly maintained and used correctly.

Other activities during the day included a drama performance by the Glefe Youth Centre, which highlighted the importance of community involvement in malaria prevention, and a quiz competition for school children.

AbWMA Observe World Malaria Day

The celebration of World Malaria Day in Ablekuma West was a reminder of the ongoing efforts to combat malaria in Ghana. It was a time to reflect on the progress that has been made and the work that still needs to be done. By working together and continuing to educate communities on the importance of prevention, we can hope to one day eliminate malaria from our communities and our country.